Let’s Make Every Week Banned Books Week! by da-AL

Persepolis is discussed by a UK teen on youtube video about Banned Book Week.

Does the threat of a book being banned ensure that it’s among the finest books written? Check out the fantastic examples cited by the smart folks in this 29-second video (and pat yourself on the back if you smile when “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee is discussed — *see end of this post for why)…

Banned Book Week needs to be every week of the year! Started in the U.S., the now international event has been honored every last week of September since 1982.

* Whereas the girl in the video remembers the story as happening in South America during the 1920s, here’s how Wikipedia tells it: “The story takes place during three years (1933–35) of the Great Depression in the fictional “tired old town” of Maycomb, Alabama, the seat of Maycomb County.”

Once my novels-in-progress are published, I hope they’re not banned! How many potentially banned books have you read?

Guest Blog Post: “Merry … Alan Campbell,” in roijoyeux’ exact words

1954 publicity photo of Judy Garland: Judy Garland during filming in a drive-in restaurant for her role in the WB film A Star is Born.
1954 publicity photo of Judy Garland: Judy Garland during filming in a drive-in restaurant for her role in the WB film A Star is Born.

Finishing off Dorothy Parker week with roijoyeux’ guest blog post about Alan Campbell, Parker’s husband twice over. In 1955 they wrote the screenplay for “A Star is Born,” starring Judy Garland. During that hysterical knee-jerk McCarthy ridden era (a time we should all look to for lessons in for today), they were black-listed as anti-American for their political views.

Don’t speak French? Click Google Translate at the right of roijoyeux’ post.

More about Alan Campbell here.

Roijoyeux

D’innombrables prodiges du monde du spectacle, sportifs exceptionnels, rois, capitaines d’industrie, scientifiques, politiciens, chefs cuisiniers et autres héros – sont gays ou bisexuels…

… J’ai décidé de raconter leurs histoires afin de montrer aux personnes qui ont été brimées à cause de leur orientation sexuelle qu’il y a des gays admirables dont l’homosexualité n’a pas empêché la réussite…

Aujourd’hui je vous propose un article sur le scénariste et acteur américain Alan Campbell (1904 – 1963).

Alan K. Campbell (21 février 1904 – 14 juin 1963) était un écrivain, scénariste et acteur américain. Il forma avec son épouse Dorothy Parker une équipe de scénaristes très demandée dans le Hollywood des années d’or.

Né à Richmond (Virginie), il était l’enfant unique de Harry L. Campbell, un vendeur de feuilles de tabac et Hortense Eichel Campbell. La famille de sa mère, les Eichel, étaient des émigrés juifs originaires d’Alsace.

Il obtint son…

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Guest Blog Post: “It’s Dorothy Parker’s Birthday,” in BCarter3’s exact words

Members and associates of the Algonquin Round Table: (standing, left to right) Art Samuels and Harpo Marx; (sitting) Charles MacArthur, Dorothy Parker, and Alexander Woollcott
Members and associates of the Algonquin Round Table: (standing, left to right) Art Samuels and Harpo Marx; (sitting) Charles MacArthur, Dorothy Parker, and Alexander Woollcott

Did you know that Dorothy Parker co-screenwrote “A Star is Born,” the incredible film that starred Judy Garland?

Because it’s the week for it, here’s another tribute to the short story, poet, screenplay writing queen Parker (August 22, 1893 – June 7, 1967), this time from fellow blogger BCarter3 — and make sure to click her post to read the poem’s surprise ending …

More Songs about Buildings and Food

Dorothy Parker(22 August 1893 – 7 June 1967)

It’s been 124 years since the birth of Dorothy Parker. Poet, critic, short story writer, political activist, and one of the greatest wits of the 20th century.


I do not like my state of mind;
I’m bitter, querulous, unkind.
I hate my legs, I hate my hands,
I do not yearn for lovelier lands.
I dread the dawn’s recurrent light;
I hate to go to bed at night.
I snoot at simple, earnest folk.
I cannot take the gentlest joke.
I find no peace in paint or type.
My world is but a lot of tripe.
I’m disillusioned, empty-breasted.
For what I think, I’d be arrested.
I am not sick, I am not well.
My quondam dreams are shot to hell.
My soul is crushed, my spirit sore;
I do not like me any more.
I cavil, quarrel, grumble, grouse.
I ponder…

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Guest Blog Post: “Excuse My Dust,” in Donal Clancy’s exact words

Dorothy Parker

Dorothy Parker (August 22, 1893 – June 7, 1967) week here at Happiness Between Tails continues! Ever the master of using a brilliant bow of wit to snare darkness with light, here’s three more of her famed quotations …

“I hate writing. I love having written.”

“Living well is the best revenge.”

“I’d like to have money. And I’d like to be a good writer. These two can come together, and I hope they will, but if that’s too adorable, I’d rather have money.”

a poem …

Razors pain you.

Rivers are damp.

Acids stain you and

drugs cause cramps.

Guns aren’t lawful.

Nooses give.

Gas smells awful.

You might as well live.

and another guest blog post …

Mindship

MrsParker

Born on this day in 1893 Dorothy Parker, writer & poet is possibly best known for her famous wit.  Her one liners are sharp as a knife.  Lines like “A girls best friend is her mutter” or “The cure for boredom is curiosity, there is no cure for curiosity”.  Her wit developed at an early age when she lost her mother and her father remarried.  She refused to call her stepmother anything civil and referred to her as the housekeeper.

She joked that she married to cover up her Jewish background and avoid anti-Semitism.  She was an avid anti-fascist and became aligned with left leaning politics in the 1930s. She was blacklisted in Hollywood in the 1950s McCarthy era as a communist.

“Excuse my dust” was her suggestion for her epitaph.  When she died in 1967 she bequeathed her estate to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. After his death her estate…

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Guest Blog Post: “I wore my love like a red, wet stain on the breast of a velvet gown,” by Summer Pierre

Honoring amazing writer Dorothy Parker (August 22, 1893 – June 7, 1967), beloved as much for her honest and imaginative pen as for her witty and unique personality. Here Summer Pierre has composed a lovely drawing …

Paper Pencil Life

dorothy parker

Happy Birthday, Dorothy Parker!

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Happy Birthday, Dorothy Parker! by da-AL

Writer and wit extraordinaire, Dorothy Parker: August 22, 1893 – June 7, 1967

“The first thing I do in the morning is brush my teeth and sharpen my tongue.”
Dorothy Parker

At a time when women were supposed to be stay-at-home moms and the writers who got press tended to be men, Dorothy Parker hit the 1920s running — her mouth off as well as her pen. She was known as much for her biting wit as she was for her phenomenal writing.

She began at the New Yorker, where work days often included long boozy lunches with fellow stellar writers at New York’s fancy Algonquin Hotel.

In my early teens, I first read “The Portable Dorothy Parker.” Each of the short stories and poems included in it is a gem. I was hooked!

Wiki describes her as ‘poet, short story writer, critic, and satirist, best known for her wit, wisecracks, and eye for 20th-century urban foibles.’ In addition, she wrote many enormously successful screenplays with her gay husband, Alan Campbell, who she married twice.

In recognition of her greatness, stay tuned for guests posts about her.